Yes It Is

the_beatles-ticket_to_ride_s_4

Not so long ago I ran into a version of “Yes It Is” on Facebook. You know, that Beatles song that was first released in 1965 as the B-side of the “Ticket To Ride” single, anticipating the arrival of the album “Help!” Yes, exactly, that exceptional LP containing the soundtrack of that original and funny film directed by Richard Lester, starring the “Fab Four.” The point is, that I did not expect it, but I thought I had never before heard the version available on YouTube which I was led to by the link provided. It was the track included in “Anthology 2.” Although I thought I had paid enough attention to each and every one of the cuts of the trilogy, this curious version of “Yes It Is” was to me now more innovative and shocking than it was when my collector’s zeal led me to buy the compact discs and even a couple of vinyl volumes of that collection. What happened to those unpredictable and sometimes baffling vocal harmonies, those complex chords plagued with halftones that caused me the vertigo of the senses? Was it that I was perceiving the sound abyss that these arpeggios seemed doomed to if they made a minimal mistake? Difficult to find out which road Lennon had decided to drive the vehicle of his emotions. Nevertheless the nature of the composition allows one not to have too many doubts about the depth of those feelings. Of course, the vocal harmonies were developed thanks to the creative talent of the great producer George Martin, who played his part in the final arrangements. Sad to know he passed away recently. There’s also something to say about the intimate way Lennon introduced the song, just whispering the first verses. The saddest thing was to think that this poignant Lennon creation emerged at the time as B-Side and hardly anyone payed it the attention it deserved. Probably many of us did not even turn the disk around to listen to it when a copy fell into our hands for the first time. My curiosity was evident and I had to dig a little deeper on the gestation of this cut, the recording and singular details of this particular version.

This great little song that the single “Ticket To Ride” hid on its B-Side was a composition Lennon wrote in his house in Kenwood, Surrey. Paul McCartney said later to have been there when they completed the final piece. On Barry Miles book, “Many Years From Now,” Paul commented that it was Lennon’s inspiration that he helped him finish off. He was claiming it was a remarkable ballad, something quite unusual in his colleague’s work despite having written a few ballads of unquestionable beauty. On it Lennon showed his romantic side in stark contradiction to his public image, often more scathing. In a 1980 “Playboy” magazine interview Lennon himself described it as a failed attempt to rewrite “This Boy.” Certainly there are similarities between the two issues, especially in the musical structure, 12/8 time signature, three-part vocal harmonies and the string of chords in the purest Doo-Wop style. However, when both compositions are analyzed thoroughly the comparison proves its author was going a few steps further in this work, leading us to deeper waters in the musical and emotional ground. The score, in the key of E, shows a striking originality and greater complexity in the succession of chords and changes occurring in the tune we are reviewing.

ticket-to-ride-yes-it-is-beatles45d

“Yes It Is” was recorded on February 16, 1965, in Abbey Road studios. The same day in which they finished the recording of “I Need You,” the great Harrison tune. The Beatles completed the rhythm and instrumental part, recording 14 different takes after 2 arduous hours of studio work, between 5 and 7 pm. It was much more than they had ever invested in any other song they recorded that year. Apparently John was excited about George’s use of the tone pedal of his guitar during the recording of “I Need You” and considering that it added some melancholy mood he asked him to please use it in this piece of his. After completing the basic track, Lennon, McCartney and Harrison spent three hours more perfecting their vocal harmonies while recording singing live together. The final recording features some of the more complex and dissonant three-part vocal harmonies of the Beatles.

The version to which I refer was released in the album “The Beatles Anthology 2.” The track actually consisted of two different takes conveniently mixed. The cut – I quote more or less literally Enrique Cabrera’s comment in his excellent site The Spanish Beatles Page – starts with take 2, the Beatles trying to perfect their accompaniment while John Lennon simply mutters the first lines in a startlingly intimate form, as a guide, ending at the bridge singing “die-de-de-die”. That take had been interrupted because John broke a guitar string. The song is completed with take 14 (the original master recorded live in the studio with the three-part vocal harmonies honed to perfection) which in this version has been miraculously re-edited and re-mixed by George Martin (producer) and Geoff Emerick (sound engineer). The result is more than satisfactory. It could be described as prodigious.

“Yes It Is” was released at the time, in 1965, as B-side of “Ticket to Ride” single, both in the UK and the United States. The American copies of the disc mistakenly credited this issue as belonging to the movie “Eight Arms to Hold You”, original title of the film “Help!”, in which it was never included.

s-l1600-BSide

The song then appeared in the “Beatles VI” in the United States, but Capitol Records received no copy of the stereo mix. When included in their make-shift album “Beatles VI”, they created an artificial stereo mix, a “duophonic” copy of the mono mix they had received, adding further reverb in the process.

The+Beatles+Beatles+VI+-+Purple+Label+-+La+333618

It was also included in later compilations such as “Love Songs”, the British version of the album “Rarities”, the “Past Masters Volume One” (which made its first appearance as true stereo) and “Anthology 2” (alternate mix). The original mono mix only appears in the Mono Masters CD as part of the “The Beatles In Mono” box set.

The meaning of the lyrics are dark and yet the lines, full of suggestions, penetrate into the heart, accompanied by the voices and the melancholy tone of the composition:

“Yes It Is”

If you wear red tonight
Remember what I said tonight
For red is the color, that my baby wore
And what is more, it’s true
Yes it is

Scarlet were the clothes she wore
Everybody knows I’ve sure
I could remember all the things we planned
Understand, it’s true
Yes it is, it’s true
Yes it is

I could be happy with you by my side
If I could forget her, but it’s my pride
Yes it is, yes it is
Oh, yes it is, yeah

Please do not wear red tonight
This is what I said tonight
For red is the color, that will make me blue
In spite of you, it’s true
Yes it is, it’s true
Yes it is

I could be happy with you by my side
If I could forget her, but it’s my pride
Yes it is, yes it is
Oh, yes it is, yeah

Please do not wear red tonight
This is what I said tonight
For red is the color, that will make me blue
In spite of you, it’s true
Yes it is, it’s true
Yes it is, it’s true

Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

The general belief was that the lady in red was an old lost love. That is the first thing one tends to think when you hear the song without analyzing the lyrics in depth. Looks like the line saying “but it’s my pride” refers to a failed relationship, as if resentment is preventing him to forget because of wounded pride in the feeling of abandonment. However, Ian MacDonald in his book “Revolution In The Head”, published in 1997, suggests the influence of Edgar Allan Poe by invoking the scarlet color and a hint that the lost lover referred to in the lyrics is dead. In the same paragraph he speaks of romanticism and mentions the feverish and tormented tone of the composition.

RITH

MacDonald does not provide any argument, although it is not difficult to accept his theory if we think of the line saying “I could remember all the things we planned.” It seems to indicate that she will not return, that she’s no longer of this world. Forever vanished is the chance that these plans are met. Because often the greatest anguish when we suffer the untimely death of a loved one is to evoke the amount of unfinished things and incomplete plans that will never happen. We could also admit the weak insinuation that Dave Rybaczewski makes when he argues that no man in his right mind would call his former lost lover “my baby,” unless she had died. Even less a jilted man. MacDonald’s analysis goes way further when pointing out that “the fantastic figure conjured here is probably a transmutation of Lennon’s late mother, Julia redhead.” On this issue I have failed to find any verification, except an unreliable statement randomly found: Someone commented on Songfacts, one of the sites consulted, that if we were true Beatles’ fans and we had read the book “The Beatles Anthology” we would have discovered the song was referring to Julia, John’s mother. The commenter stated she was wearing a red suit when she died run over by a drunken off-duty policemen while waiting at the bus stop. I spent an afternoon rereading the “Anthology” to try to corroborate that assertion and I failed to find anything to confirm it. In his personal biographical pages Lennon chronicled everything related to his mother’s death in detail, but did not mention at all how she was dressed at the moment of the accident. The chapter on the year 1965 includes comments from the Beatles themselves, or their collaborators, about the songs on the album “Help!” And they do not speak of “Yes It Is” in any way. It does not even appear in the index. In any case, the song is so much more haunting if we give the least credit to Ian MacDonald suggestions. It is true that the way Lennon sings these two lines “I could be happy with you by my side If I could forget her, but it’s my pride…” and how he insists in the chorus repeating that “Yes, it is” emphasizing what he does not even dare to mention: “Yes it is, yes it is, Oh, yes it is, yeah,” makes one guess that the truth to which he refers hides a true drama, a tragedy which is impossible for him to escape from. Her memory will haunt him forever. One wonders why he speaks of pride then, if it is about Julia. The only explanation I can think of is that his wounded pride was caused by the neglect he may have felt during the years his mother was separated from him. And even more painful for him to understand that he had to resign himself to definitely losing her, right when he believed to have recovered her forever.

29 chansons du film help french ep beatles picture sleeve

It is significant that John Lennon, reportedly, never came to feel proud of the song and even dismissed it, especially after the split of the band. George Harrison rather liked it better than “Ticket To Ride” and considered it worthy of being the main side of the single. Cynthia Lennon (John’s wife back then and mother of his son Julian, Cynthia Powell as maiden) always thought it was excellent, stating on occasion that it was her favorite Beatles song. Many critics have praised the evocative simplicity of the lyrics, with the mysterious image of the woman in red, the strength of the chorus, the boldness of its complex succession of chords, the fascinating perfection of the three-part vocal harmonies and the melancholic mood of the melody underlined by Harrison’s pedal. Others claim not to know exactly what it is what moves them in it, it simply reaches the depths of the bowels. But perhaps Lennon aspired to something so sublime in that attempt, something so intimate and revealing to his own understanding, probably something that lies at the core of his being, that any achievement would have always seemed undeserving to him. Or perhaps the emotional bondage to a tragic past ceased to have any meaning for him, once he found fulfillment in his maturity, as has been suggested. The truth is that he left for the posterity a great song that, as a certain Michelle commented on one of the sites I’ve visited, “even today, after 50 years, it is like a roundhouse kick to the heart” and its poignant beauty can always flood you and make you cry or give you the chills down your spin, shaking you from head to toes. I am not exaggerating! Come back to listen to it, if you have not already done it recently. You will be grateful to me.

Written by: Lennon-McCartney
Recorded: 16 February 1965
Producer: George Martin
Engineer: Norman Smith

Single (7 inches 45 rpm) – Released:  9 April 1965 (UK), 19 April 1965 (US)

Instrumentation (most likely):

John Lennon: vocals, acoustic rhythm guitar (1964 Ramirez A-1 Segovia)
Paul McCartney: vocal harmonies, bass (1963 Hofner 500/1)
George Harrison: vocal harmonies, lead guitar (1963 Gretsch 6119 Tennessean)
Ringo Starr: drums (hi-hat, cymbals) (1964 Ludwig Super Classic Black Oyster Pearl)

Available at present in the following albums:

Past Masters
Anthology 2 (alternate mix)

The Hypnotist Collector

Bibliography:

MacDonald, Ian  (1997) Revolution In The Head (Revolución en la Mente) @2000, Celeste Ediciones ISBN 84-8211-221-X

Rybaczewski, Dave (21 February 2010) Beatles Music History: The In-Depth Story Behind The Songs of The Beatles. Retrieved 6 June 2016 from http://www.beatlesebooks.com/yes-it-is

Songfacts staff (no date stated) Yes It Is by The Beatles – Album: Beatles VI. Retrieved 6 June 2016 from http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=9759

Sanchez Gutiérrez, Quirino @vidrioso-Mexico (31 December 2010) Canción del Día–Yes It Is. Retrieved 18 June 2016 from http://www.taringa.net/comunidades/thebeatlesfans/1544417/Cancion-del-Dia-Yes-It-is.html

Cabrera, Enrique (1995) The Spanish Beatles Page. Retrieved 19 June 2016 from http://www.upv.es/~ecabrera/index.html

Advertisements

Yes It Is (Si Lo Es)

the_beatles-ticket_to_ride_s_4

No hace mucho me tope en Facebook con una versión de “Yes It Is”. Ya sabéis, esa canción de los Beatles que se publicó inicialmente en 1965 como cara-B del sencillo “Ticket To Ride”, anticipando la llegada del álbum “Help!”. Sí, exactamente, aquél excepcional LP que contenía la banda sonora de la original y divertida película dirigida por Richard Lester y protagonizada por los “Fab Four”. La cuestión es que, no lo esperaba, pero me pareció no haber escuchado nunca antes la versión disponible en YouTube a la que me dirigía el enlace. Se trataba de la pista incluida en el “Anthology 2”. Aunque creía haber prestado la necesaria atención a todos y cada uno de los cortes de esa trilogía, esta curiosa versión de “Yes It Is” me resultaba ahora más novedosa y mucho más impactante que entonces, cuando mi afán coleccionista me llevó a comprar los “compact discs” e incluso un par de volúmenes en vinilo de esa colección ¿Que ocurría con esas imprevisibles y a veces desconcertantes armonías vocales, esos complejos acordes plagados de semitonos que provocaban en mi ese vértigo de los sentidos? ¿Era acaso que percibía el abismo sonoro al que esos arpegios parecían abocados al menor descuido? Difícil averiguar por que vericuetos, Lennon, responsable en su mayor parte de la canción, había decidido llevar el vehículo de sus emociones. Aunque la naturaleza de la composición no admite demasiadas dudas sobre la profundidad de esos sentimientos. Claro que las armonías vocales fueron elaboradas gracias al talento creador del genial productor George Martin, recientemente fallecido, que intervino en los arreglos definitivos ¿Y que decir de la forma íntima en que Lennon introduce la canción apenas susurrando los primeros versos? Lo más triste era pensar que esta incisiva creación de John había surgido en su momento como cara-B y apenas nadie le había dedicado la atención que merecía. Probablemente incluso muchos de nosotros ni siquiera dimos la vuelta al disco para escucharla cuando el ejemplar cayó en nuestras manos por primera vez. Mi perplejidad era manifiesta y tuve que indagar un poco más a fondo sobre la gestación de este corte, la grabación y los pormenores de ésta singular versión en concreto.

Este pequeño gran tema que el sencillo “Ticket To Ride” escondía en su cara-B era una composición que Lennon escribió en su casa de Kenwood, Surrey. Paul McCartney declaró mas tarde haber estado allí cuando dieron con la pieza definitiva, pero reconociendo la autoría de John y afirmando que era una balada notable, algo bastante inusual en el trabajo de su colega a pesar de haber escrito unas cuantas de belleza incuestionable. En ella mostraba Lennon su lado romántico en franca contradicción con su imagen pública, a menudo más mordaz. El propio Lennon la describía después en una entrevista concedida a la revista “Playboy” en 1980 como un intento fallido de reescribir “This Boy”. Ciertamente existen similitudes entre ambos temas, sobre todo en la estructura musical, el compás 12/8, las armonías vocales a tres voces y la ristra de acordes al más puro estilo Doo-Wop. Sin embargo, cuando se analizan ambas composiciones minuciosamente la comparación prueba que su autor iba unos cuantos pasos más allá en este trabajo, llevándonos hacia más profundas aguas en el terreno musical y emocional. La partitura, en clave de Mi, muestra una sorprendente originalidad y una mayor complejidad en la sucesión de acordes y en los cambios que se producen en la pieza que nos ocupa.

ticket-to-ride-yes-it-is-beatles45d

“Yes It is” se grabó el 16 de Febrero de 1965, en los estudios de Abbey Road. El mismo dia en el que habían llevado a cabo la grabación de “I Need You”, el gran tema de Harrison. Los Beatles completaron el ritmo y la instrumentación grabando 14 tomas diferentes durante 2 arduas horas de trabajo en el estudio, entre las 5 y las 7 de la tarde. Mas tomas de las que habían dedicado a cualquier otra canción de las que registraron ese año. Al parecer a John le entusiasmó el uso que George había hecho del pedal del volumen de su guitarra durante la grabación de “I Need You” y considerando que añadía cierta melancolía al clima le pidió que lo emplease también en esta pieza suya. Tras dar la pista básica por concluida, Lennon, McCartney y Harrison dedicaron tres horas más a perfeccionar las armonías vocales grabando los ensayos en directo. La grabación final cuenta con algunas de las armonías corales a tres voces mas complejas y disonantes de los Beatles.

La versión a la que me refiero fue publicada en el álbum “The Beatles Anthology 2”. La pista constaba en realidad de dos tomas diferentes convenientemente mezcladas. El corte – cito más o menos literalmente el comentario de Enrique Cabrera en su excelente página The Spanish Beatles Page – arranca con la toma 2, en la que los Beatles tratan de perfeccionar el acompañamiento mientras John Lennon simplemente murmura los primeros versos de forma sobrecogedoramente íntima, a modo de guía, hasta llegar incluso a tararearla. Esa toma había quedado interrumpida durante el puente porque a John se le rompió una cuerda de la guitarra. La canción se completa con la toma 14 (el master original grabado en directo en el estudio con las armonías vocales a tres voces afinadas a la perfección) que en esta versión ha sido milagrosamente re-editada y re-mezclada por George Martin (productor) y Geoff Emerick (ingeniero de sonido). El resultado es más que satisfactorio. Se podría calificar de prodigioso.

“Yes It Is” se publicó en su momento como cara-B del sencillo “Ticket to Ride” tanto en el Reino Unido como en los Estados Unidos. Las copias Americanas del disco acreditaban erróneamente este tema como perteneciente a la película “Eight Arms to Hold You (Ocho Brazos para Abrazarte)”, título original del film “Help!”, en el que nunca fue incluido.

s-l1600-BSide

La canción apareció luego en el “Beatles VI” en los Estados Unidos, pero Capitol Records no recibió ninguna copia de la mezcla estéreo, así que cuando la incluyeron en su reconstruído album “Beatles VI”, crearon una mezcla estéreo artificial, una copia “duofónica” de la mezcla mono que habían recibido, añadiendo además excesiva reverberación en el proceso.

The+Beatles+Beatles+VI+-+Purple+Label+-+La+333618

También fue incluida en recopilatorios posteriores como “Love Songs”, la versión Británica del álbum “Rarities”, el “Past Masters Volume One” (en el que hizo su primera aparición como auténtico estéreo) y en el “Anthology 2” (alternate mix). La mezcla mono original solo aparece en el Mono Masters CD como parte de la caja titulada “The Beatles In Mono”.

El significado de la letra es oscuro y sin embargo los versos, cargados de sugerencias, penetran en el corazón, acompañados de las voces y el tono melancólico de la composición:

“Yes It Is”

If you wear red tonight
Remember what I said tonight
For red is the color that my baby wore
And what is more, it’s true
Yes it is

Scarlet were the clothes she wore
Everybody knows I’ve sure
I could remember all the things we planned
Understand, it’s true
Yes it is, it’s true
Yes it is

I could be happy with you by my side
If I could forget her, but it’s my pride
Yes it is, yes it is
Oh, yes it is, yeah

Please don’t wear red tonight
This is what I said tonight
For red is the color that will make me blue
In spite of you, it’s true
Yes it is, it’s true
Yes it is

I could be happy with you by my side
If I could forget her, but it’s my pride
Yes it is, yes it is
Oh, yes it is, yeah

Please don’t wear red tonight
This is what I said tonight
For red is the color that will make me blue
In spite of you, it’s true
Yes it is, it’s true
Yes it is, it’s true

=======================

“Si lo es”

Si vistes de rojo esta noche,
Recuerda lo que te dije,
Porque rojo es el color que mi chica vestía
Y lo que es más, es verdad,
Sí, lo es.

Escarlata el vestido que ella llevaba
Todo el mundo lo sabe, estoy seguro
Recordaría todo lo que habíamos planeado
Comprendelo, es verdad,
Si lo es, es verdad
Si lo es.

Sería feliz contigo a mi lado,
Si pudiese olvidarla, pero se trata de mi orgullo
Si lo es, si lo es,
¡Oh, si lo es, siiii!

Por favor no vistas de rojo esta noche
Eso es lo que digo esta noche
Porque rojo es el color que me entristece
A pesar de ti, es verdad,
Si lo es, es verdad
Si lo es.

Sería feliz contigo a mi lado,
Si pudiese olvidarla, pero se trata de mi orgullo
Si lo es, si lo es,
¡Oh, si lo es, siiii!

Por favor no vistas de rojo esta noche
Eso es lo que digo esta noche
Porque rojo es el color que me entristece
A pesar de ti, es verdad,
Si lo es, es verdad
Si lo es, es verdad

Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

La creencia general había sido que la chica de rojo era un antiguo amor perdido. Eso es lo primero que tiende uno a pensar cuando escucha la canción sin analizar la letra en profundidad. Se diría que el verso “pero se trata de mi orgullo” alude a una relación fallida, como si el resentimiento le impidiese olvidarla a causa del orgullo herido por el sentimiento de abandono. Sin embargo, Ian MacDonald en su libro “Revolution In The Head (Revolución En La Mente)”, publicado en 1997, sugiere la influencia de Edgar Alan Poe al invocar el color escarlata y la existencia de una insinuación de que la amante perdida a la que se refiere en la canción esta muerta. En el mismo párrafo habla de romanticismo y menciona el tono febril y atormentado de la composición.

RITH

MacDonald no aporta argumento alguno, aunque no resulta difícil aceptar su teoría si pensamos en el verso que dice “recordaría todo lo que habíamos planeado”. Parece indicar que ella no volverá, que ya no es de este mundo. Se esfumó para siempre la oportunidad de que esos planes se cumplan. Porque a menudo el mayor tormento cuando sufrimos la muerte prematura de un ser querido consiste en evocar la cantidad de cosas inacabadas y planes incompletos que ya nunca podrán llevarse a cabo. También cabría admitir la débil insinuación que Dave Rybaczewski hace cuando argumenta que ningún hombre en su sano juicio llamaría a su anterior amante “mi chica” a menos que ella hubiese fallecido. Menos aún un hombre despechado. El análisis de MacDonald va mucho mas lejos cuando apunta que “la figura fantástica que aquí se conjura es probablemente una transmutación de la difunta madre de Lennon, la pelirroja Julia”. Sobre esta cuestión no he conseguido hallar justificación alguna, salvo una declaración poco fiable encontrada al azar: Alguien comentaba en Songfacts, otra de las páginas consultadas, que si fuésemos auténticos fans de los Beatles y hubiésemos leído el libro “The Beatles Anthology” habríamos descubierto que la canción se refería a Julia, la madre de John, que llevaba un traje rojo cuando murió atropellada por un policía borracho fuera de servicio, mientras esperaba en la parada del autobús. Me pasé una tarde releyendo el “Anthology” para tratar de corroborar esa afirmación y no logré encontrar nada que lo confirme. En la sección correspondiente a su biografía personal Lennon narraba todo lo relativo a la muerte de su madre de forma pormenorizada, pero no mencionaba en absoluto como iba vestida en el momento del accidente. El capítulo dedicado al año 1965 incluye comentarios de los propios Beatles, o de sus colaboradores, acerca de las canciones del álbum “Help!” y no hablan de “Yes It Is” en modo alguno. Ni siquiera aparece en el índice. En cualquier caso, la canción resulta así mucho más conmovedora, si concedemos el menor crédito a las sugerencias de Ian MacDonald. Y es cierto que la forma en que Lennon canta esos dos versos “Sería feliz contigo a mi lado, Si pudiese olvidarla, pero se trata de mi orgullo…” y cómo insiste en el estribillo repitiendo ese “Sí, lo es”, poniendo el énfasis en lo que ni siquiera se atreve a mencionar: “Si lo es, Si lo es, Oh, si lo es, siii”, induce a sospechar que esa verdad a la que hace referencia encierra un auténtico drama, una tragedia de la que le es imposible escapar. Su recuerdo le perseguirá siempre. Cabe preguntarse por qué habla de orgullo entonces, si se refiere a Julia, y la única explicación que se me ocurre es la de su orgullo herido por el abandono que pudo haber sentido durante los años en que su madre estuvo algo más alejada de él. Una herida aún más dolorosa al comprender que debía resignarse a perderla definitivamente justo en el momento en que creía haberla recuperado para siempre.

29 chansons du film help french ep beatles picture sleeve

Es significativo el hecho de que según los informes John Lennon nunca llegara a sentirse orgulloso de la canción e incluso la minusvalorase, especialmente tras la separación del grupo. George Harrison la prefirió a “Ticket To Ride” y la consideró merecedora de ser la cara principal del “single” y a Cynthia Lennon (la mujer de John entonces y madre de su hijo Julian, Cynthia Powell de soltera) siempre le pareció excelente, manifestando en alguna ocasión que se trataba de su canción favorita de los Beatles. Numerosos críticos han elogiado la sugerente simplicidad de la letra, con la misteriosa imagen de la mujer de rojo, la fuerza del estribillo, la osadía de su compleja sucesión de acordes, la fascinante perfección de los coros y el tono melancólico de la melodía subrayado por el pedal de Harrison. Otros declaran no saber exactamente que es lo que les conmueve en ella; Sencillamente, llega a lo mas hondo de las entrañas. Pero tal vez Lennon aspiraba a algo tan sublime en ese intento, algo tan íntimo y revelador para su propio entendimiento, probablemente algo que radicaba en la esencia de su propio ser, que cualquier logro le habría parecido siempre desafortunado. O quizás la esclavitud emocional respecto a un pasado trágico dejara de tener algún significado para él, una vez encontrada la plenitud en su madurez, como se ha sugerido. Lo cierto es que nos dejó para la posteridad un magnífico tema que, como comentaba una tal Michelle en una de las páginas que he visitado, “aún hoy, después de 50 años, actúa como una patada de kárate en el corazón” y su conmovedora belleza puede inundarte y hacer que se te salten las lágrimas o provocar escalofríos sacudiéndote de la cabeza a los pies ¡No exagero! Volved a escucharla si no lo habéis hecho ya recientemente. Me lo agradeceréis.

the_beatles-ticket_to_ride_s_23

Escrita por: Lennon-McCartney
Grabada el: 16 de Febrero de 1965
Productor: George Martin
Ingeniero de sonido: Norman Smith

Sencillo (7 pulgadas 45 rpm) – Publicado: 9 de Abril de 1965 (UK), 19 de Abril de 1965 (USA)

Instrumentación (probablemente):

John Lennon: voz, guitarra rítmica acústica (1964 Ramirez A-1 Segovia)
Paul McCartney: armonías vocales, bajo (1963 Hofner 500/1)
George Harrison: armonías vocales, guitarra líder (1963 Gretsch 6119 Tennessean)
Ringo Starr: batería (platillos) (1964 Ludwig Super Classic Black Oyster Pearl)

Disponible en la actualidad en los siguientes álbums:

Past Masters
Anthology 2 (alternate mix)

El Coleccionista Hipnótico

Bibliografía:

Ian MacDonald (1997) Revolution In The Head (Revolución en la Mente) @2000, Celeste Ediciones ISBN 84-8211-221-X

Dave Rybaczewski (21 de Febrero de 2010) Beatles Music History: The In-Depth Story Behind The Songs of The Beatles. Consultado el 6 de Junio de 2016 en http://www.beatlesebooks.com/yes-it-is

Songfacts staff (sin fecha declarada) Yes It Is by The Beatles – Album: Beatles VI. Consultado el 6 de Junio de 2016 en http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=9759

Quirino Sanchez Gutierrez @vidrioso-Mexico (31 de Diciembre de 2010) Canción del Día–Yes It Is. Consultado el 18 de Junio de 2016 en http://www.taringa.net/comunidades/thebeatlesfans/1544417/Cancion-del-Dia-Yes-It-is.html

Enrique Cabrera (1995) The Spanish Beatles Page. Consultado el  19 de Junio de 2016 en http://www.upv.es/~ecabrera/indice.html

La Muerte del Rock’n’Roll

image

Coincidiendo con las primeras noticias sobre el lanzamiento del nuevo álbum de Dylan, cuyo título, “Fallen Angels (Ángeles Caídos)”, resulta ya más que sugerente, el escritor Brent L. Smith publicaba el 13 de Abril un revelador artículo que he considerado digno de ser traído aquí hoy para ser analizado y comentado. Una excelente amiga que vive en California me condujo hasta él y por ello le estoy sumamente agradecido. El ensayo se refiere a la única entrevista que Dylan concedió el año pasado, aparecida en la revista bimensual de la AARP (American Association of Retired Persons – Asociación Americana de Personas Jubiladas) a raíz de la publicación de su anterior trabajo, el insólito “Shadows in The Night (Sombras en la Noche)”, que reunía 10 viejas baladas sacadas del cancionero de Frank Sinatra. El septuagenario cantautor aclaraba en dicha entrevista las razones que le llevaron a grabar esas canciones y su genuina intención al publicar un álbum de esas características en los tiempos que corren. Pero no era esa la cuestión que motivó al autor del texto al que hago referencia a tomar dicha entrevista como punto de partida de su tesis, sino las atrevidas declaraciones que el viejo y astuto trovador hacía en ella acerca de las verdaderas razones que, según él, provocaron la muerte del Rock’n’Roll. Asombrosas declaraciones que nadie pareció tomarse en serio y sin embargo el articulista en cuestión  interpretó como la “desgarradora revelación de un asesinato silencioso”. Aunque esa es una conclusión demasiado severa.

Dylan habla de la segregación comercial que sufrió el Rock cuando el movimiento a favor de los derechos civiles comenzó a cobrar fuerza. El Rock’n’Roll – dice – había sido desde sus inicios un invento Americano racialmente integrado, pura fusión inyectada a través de las ondas en los dormitorios de los adolescentes desde mediados de los 50. En el momento en que la lucha por los derechos civiles parece amenazar el orden establecido, el género resulta convenientemente dividido, por la astucia del sistema, entre música de Blancos (Invasión Británica) y música de Negros (Soul). Las declaraciones de Dylan ponen de manifiesto las razones que hicieron posible dicha segregación. Los prejuicios raciales llevan a considerar el mestizaje del Rock algo extremadamente amenazador y deciden desmantelarlo, empezando por el llamado escándalo del “Payola”. Las compañías discográficas y distribuidoras sobornaban a los DJ’s para que difundiesen determinados discos de forma sistemática, logrando así dejar fuera de las ondas toda la Música Negra, especialmente aquella que estaba lejos de su control e iba en contra de sus intereses.

image

Lester Lanin durante los interrogatorios del escándalo del “Payola”

February 1, 1960                                                    Photo Credit: Ed Clark

Es evidente que las acusaciones de Dylan son irrefutables. Citando a Smith, “ese fue un momento desmoralizador en el historicismo de la música” y leyendo su artículo podemos constatar “los devastadores efectos que el gran capital puede tener cuando despliega semejante aparato en el intento de secuestrar la música para siempre”. Pero llegar a creer que verdaderamente algo asesinó al Rock es demasiado derrotista. Se ha hablado mucho sobre la muerte del Rock’n’Roll desde el advenimiento del Punk y muchos artistas, además de los Sex Pistols, han tratado el tema en sus canciones, pero aún así, todavía hoy, parece aventurado asegurar que el Rock ha muerto.

Por diversas razones que el artículo de Smith analiza en profundidad muy acertadamente el Rock es considerado depravado, escandaloso, vulgar y pernicioso dentro de la burguesía, viéndose rechazado por las buenas costumbres y perseguido por el poder establecido. El artículo de Smith indaga sobre el asunto esgrimiendo razonamientos inspirados en diversas fuentes que van desde los escritos de Norman Mailer acerca del Negro Blanco, el hipster y la inherente sexualidad del jazz a las declaraciones de Frank Sinatra y Martin Luther King Jr. en detrimento del Rock’n’Roll, pasando por las consideraciones de John Adams vertidas en una carta escrita en 1779. En la mencionada carta Adams describía la depravación del ambiente y el impacto de la música que se escuchaba en las tabernas y “public houses (casas de citas)” (también conocidas como pubs) frecuentadas por los negros, en los siguientes términos: “El delirante estruendo sería suficiente para inducir a cualquier ser humano sensato y virtuoso a abandonar tan execrable raza a su propia perdición”.

Pero, como apunta el propio Smith: “Donde unos ven depravación y vulgaridad, otros ven liberación. Donde unos oyen delirante estruendo otros escuchan música”.

image

La canción de Don Mc Lean, “American Pie”, habla de la evolución del Rock’n’Roll a través de las décadas hasta 1971, comenzando por los 50 y el famoso verso “the Day the music died (el Día que murió la música)“, en clara alusión al fatídico accidente de aviación que se cobró las vidas de Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens y J.P. “Big Bopper” Richardson en un despiadado golpe del destino. Eso ocurría en Febrero de 1959. El último año de la década resultó ser tristemente perjudicial para el Rock. Junto al fatal incidente que causó la muerte de esas tres figuras míticas, Chuck Berry era arrestado en Diciembre y procesado “por cruzar las fronteras del estado transportando a una menor con fines inmorales en flagrante violación del Acta de Mann (Mann Act)”. Aunque la primera causa fue sobreseída (ya que alegó haber sido objeto de prejuicios raciales) el juzgado decidió volver a procesar a Berry. Tras el segundo juicio fue finalmente condenado a tres años de cárcel. Todo esto, unido a los escándalos del “Payola”, la desenfrenada sexualidad inherente al Rock’n’Roll y la depravación vista en ello, provocó la estampida que dejó al Rock en manos de los blancos y lo debilitó hasta convertirlo en un lenguaje fácilmente asimilable por el sistema.

Naturalmente, tal depravación solo era vista por “aquellos que compartían el código liberal de Adams, con su sentido elitista de puritana moralidad” – como Smith define con rigurosa precisión – los mismos que “sentaron las bases de la ‘Independencia’ Americana y su consecuentemente negativo sistema de valores heredado hasta nuestros días”.

Hay que tener en cuenta que, como sugería Dylan cuando hablaba del movimiento por los derechos civiles, mencionando incluso el escándalo del “Payola”, el problema no era solo una cuestión de carácter racial o moral, sino que implicaba también intereses políticos y económicos, sin duda la verdadera preocupación de las principales compañías discográficas y distribuidoras. Smith alude a lo mismo, en un contexto político, cuando se refiere a aquellos que “sentaron las bases de la ‘Independencia’ Americana y su consecuentemente negativo sistema de valores”.

Es por esa razón que, declara Smith, “todavía existen aquellos que activamente rechazan el legado de semejante sistema de valores. Y es esta clase de rechazo, desviación, transgresión, algo que no solo yace en las raíces de lo que en realidad significa la desinhibida música Americana, sino que se ha convertido en una tradición en si mismo de la izquierda Americana”.

De todos modos, el proceso de segregación del Rock’n’Roll se logró de forma satisfactoria, como refleja Smith: “El Doo-wop fue inventado en los años 40 por una juventud negra en las esquinas de las calles, pero alcanzó las listas de éxitos a finales de los 50 cuando los Italo-Americanos lo adoptaron como suyo propio, mientras la mayoría de los intérpretes Afro-Americanos se pasaban a la música Soul”.

“Cuando el ‘Twist And Shout’ llega a América desde el otro lado del charco en 1964, el Rock’n’Roll ya había sufrido un linchamiento infernal ¿Quien – se pregunta Smith – era capaz de escuchar algo mas allá de los ineludibles aullidos de la Beatlemanía?”

image

A este punto el Rock’n’Roll se ha convertido en una cosa de músicos Blancos. No se ve un solo cantante Negro, ni guitarrista, liderando una banda de Rock’n’Roll, desde que Berry fue apartado del negocio. Pero Jimi Hendrix aparece en la escena del Rock para cambiar las cosas, volviendo a lo que siempre debería haber sido, de acuerdo con la teoría de Smith. Como Dylan hizo antes, “Bringing It All Back Home (Trayendolo Todo de Vuelta a Casa)” desde las Islas Británicas, Jimi aportaría su “Experience (Experiencia)” para llevar de nuevo al Rock’n’Roll a un terreno racialmente integrado.

Eso es lo que Brent L. Smith llama el Enigma Hendrix. Según sus propias palabras, “El acompañante-en-una-banda-de-R&B-convertido-en-fascinante-rockero, Jimi Hendrix, no solo revolucionó la manera de tocar la guitarra eléctrica, sino que psicodelizó su forma en una única actuación”. El autor del referido artículo continúa proporcionándonos una bastante emocional narración de los hechos ocurridos en el Monterrey Pop Festival en 1967, cuando Jimi Hendrix asombró a la audiencia, y al mundo, incendiando su guitarra, en “uno de los momentos mas intensos de la historia de la música Americana”.

image

Instantes después del acto flamígero, el joven fotógrafo Ed Caraeff “con literalmente el último disparo de su carrete, capturó una de las imágenes más icónicas del Rock. Incluso tuvo que utilizar su cámara para escudarse frente a las llamas que Hendrix invocaba con sus manos hacia las alturas”. Smith aún añade, “Era uno de esos momentos en los que aplaudir resulta casi vulgar”. Para hacernos sentir como si hubiésemos estado allí nos cuenta lo que la testigo de primera mano Michelle Philips de los Mamas And The Papas recuerda: “Yo estaba entre el público y estaba aterrada. No era el contenido sexual de su espectáculo lo que me aterraba, sino lo que hizo con su instrumento. Estaba arrojando gasolina sobre su guitarra y prendiéndole fuego. Nunca había visto nada igual en mi vida”. Entonces el joven escritor concluye: “Era algo al mismo tiempo tan sagrado y tan eléctrico; Apunta hacia lo espiritual – ¿o mas exactamente, lo esencial? – Después de todo, era la primera declaración matrimonial entre el Blues y la Psicodelia: Al Rock’n’Roll se le otorgaba un renacimiento místico”. Y llegando al extremo definitivamente religioso, Smith sacraliza el acontecimiento preguntándose, “Quemando su guitarra en efigie ¿aseguraba Hendrix la salvación del Rock en toda su pureza, para cualquiera en disposición de abrazarlo? Si los 50 fueron los días del viejo testamento del Rock ¿Era Hendrix aquí el uncido para morir por todos nuestros pecados?” Leyéndole tiene uno que reconocer la trascendencia de la actuación de Jimi Hendrix, incluso estar de acuerdo en que la influencia del guitarrista negro ha sido inconmensurable. Tenemos que admitir la fuerza devastadora y la significación de su revolucionario acto, pero yo tiendo a creer que había también mucho exhibicionismo en toda aquella parafernalia de la Jimi Hendrix Experience. De cualquier modo, fue ciertamente el gran momento, el manifiesto Rock de una vuelta a las raíces. Como el propio Smith escribe, “Lo que fuera que Hendrix fuese, él era el único intérprete capaz de reconciliar el roto, racialmente cargado y dicotomizado estado del Rock’n’Roll”.

De forma misteriosa, pero fácilmente comprensible, Smith vuelve a Dylan y escribe, “Sin olvidar que el más grandioso single de Hendrix fue la inmortal versión del ‘All Along The Watchtower’ de Bob Dylan, me gustaría regresar a la todavía leyenda viviente por derecho propio”. Y a continuación, inteligentemente afirma, “Cuando Dylan se volvió eléctrico en 1965 eso fue visto como una traición al género folk, algo que un montón de fans odiaron y por lo que le despreciaron, incluso hasta el día de hoy”. En realidad, “la transformación de trovador solitario a líder eléctrico fue, de hecho, su total reconocimiento y lealtad a la más pura música Americana. El Rock’n’Roll era una forma de arte nueva que emergía de la expansión más profunda del espíritu Americano”. Por supuesto, es verdad, y Dylan lo sabía, así que, “simplemente, hacia honor a sus raíces”.

Hay una excelente canción que una vez escribió Neil Young, titulada, “Hey Hey, My My (Out of The Blue)”, que formó parte de la banda sonora original de la película de Dennis Hopper “Out of The Blue”. El “film” retrataba a una adolescente Punk, fan de Elvis, que pensando que “es mejor arder que desvanecerse” comete suicidio después de asesinar a sus padres, en un intento de matar al Rock’n’Roll para siempre. Pero tal como la letra de Neil, en emocionante contraste con las imágenes de esa película, afirma: “El Rock’n’Roll permanecerá, hey hey, my my, el Rock’n’Roll nunca morirá”. Y esa es la única verdad.

Smith aún escribe un más que interesante epílogo en el cual describe lo que está sucediendo en los garajes e  improvisados  estudios a través del país en America – y yo añadiría, en todo el mundo. Como él dice, “Eso nos indica que a pesar de los turbulentos efectos de la expansión digital en todos los sectores de nuestra cultura en el siglo XXI, el Rock’n’Roll no solo está todavía pataleando sino que está floreciendo y lo está haciendo en la iluminada oscuridad, fuera del foco de atención de la cultura dominante”. Y si, incluso “aunque pueda ser arrebatado y comprado, apartado de la calle y desvergonzadamente adulterado en estudios corporativos otra vez ahora” lo que realmente sabemos es que la subterránea reactivación del ‘garage rock’ en la actualidad “prueba que es su espíritu lo que persiste y lo que vuelve a turbar el ‘statu quo’. Aún incita a los jóvenes de corazón a acudir a actuaciones en directo y está sacando a los adolescentes fuera de la aséptica monotonía  de los centros comerciales de los suburbios”.

Todo esto sucede, y sucederá siempre, porque, como escribió Dylan, “No se puede matar una idea”. Mientras haya alguien ahí fuera dispuesto a coger una guitarra, deseando echar el resto cantando para expresar su descontento por lo que está mal en el mundo, el Rock’n’Roll seguirá ahí, “out of the blue (caído del cielo)”… “and into the black (y en lo negro)”.

El Coleccionista Hipnótico

Bibliografía:

Brent L. Smith (13 de Abril de 2016) Like It Is: Bob Dylan Explains What Really Killed Rock’n’Roll. Consultado el 14 de Mayo de 2016 en https://medium.com/cuepoint/like-it-is-bob-dylan-explains-what-really-killed-rock-n-roll-f6a4b6587a1a#.

James Morgan, BBC News – Washington, DC (7 de Abril de 2015) What Do American Pie’s Lyrics mean? Consultado el 17 de Mayo de 2016 en http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-32196117

history.com Staff – This Day In History (28 de Octubre de 2009) Chuck Berry Goes On Trial For The Second Time. Consultado el 17 de Mayo de 2016 en http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/chuck-berry-goes-on-trial-for-the-second-time