Klas Burling Interview with Bob Dylan Stockholm 1966

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In 1966, Swedish Radio journalist Klas Burling interviewed Bob Dylan in a Stockholm hotel room.

Dylan – in the midst of the tour that would produce the recent Live 1966 – The “Royal Albert Hall” Concert – played Burling acetates of his upcoming album, Blonde on Blonde. The singer had been through a rough night, and as Burling remembers, “He was totally out of it. When he took his shades off, his eyes were like raisins. It was the worst interview of my life.”

Hotel Flamingo
Solna, Sweden
April 28, 1966

Klas Burling interview.

KB: Very nice to see you in Stockholm. Could you explain a bit more about yourself and your kind of songs? What do you think of the protest-song type?
BD: Um . . . er . . . God. No, I’m not going to sit here and do that. I’ve been up all night, I’ve taken some pills, and I’ve eaten bad food, and I’ve read the wrong things, and I’ve been out for 100-mph car rides, and let’s not sit here and talk about myself as a protest singer.

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KB: “The Times They Are A-Changin'” – that was supposed to be a protest song, no?
BD: Oh, God, how long ago was that?

KB: A year ago.
BD: Well, c’mon, a year ago? I’m not trying to be a bad fellow or anything, but I’d be a liar or a fool to go along with all this business. I just can’t help it if you’re a year behind, you know.

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Bob Dylan – photo by Jan Persson/Redferns

KB: Are you a poet? A singer? Or do you write poems and then put music to them?
BD: No. I don’t know. It’s so silly. You wouldn’t ask these questions of a carpenter, would you?

KB: It wouldn’t be interesting the same way.
BD: It’s interesting to me; it should be just as interesting to you. What do you think Mozart would say if you asked him these questions? “Tell me, Mr. Mozart, er…”

KB: Well, I wouldn’t interview him.
BD: Well, how come you do it to me?

KB: Because I’m interested in your records, and Swedish audiences are, also.
BD: Well, I’m interested in the Swedish audiences, too, but I’m sure they don’t want to know all these dumb things. Swedish people are smarter than that

KB: You know many Swedes?
BD: I know plenty. I happen to be a Swede myself.

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                 Bob Dylan on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine March 14, 1974 – issue 156                          illustration by Paul Davis

KB: Shall we listen to a song?
BD: You can try. This one happens to be a protest song. This specific one, “Rainy Day Women,” happens to deal with a minority of cripples and Orientals and the world in which they live. It’s sort of a Mexican kind of thing – very protesty. One of the protestiest things of all things I’ve ever protested against in the protest years.

This article is from the January 21st, 1999 issue of “Rolling Stone” magazine.

Rereleased on line as “Looking Back: Bob Dylan’s Disastrous 1966 Interview in Sweden”

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Rainy Day Women #12 & 35 (written by Bob Dylan)

Well, they’ll stone ya when you’re trying to be so good
They’ll stone ya just a-like they said they would
They’ll stone ya when you’re tryin’ to go home
Then they’ll stone ya when you’re there all alone
But I would not feel so all alone

Everybody must get stoned

Well, they’ll stone ya when you’re walkin’ ’long the street
They’ll stone ya when you’re tryin’ to keep your seat
They’ll stone ya when you’re walkin’ on the floor
They’ll stone ya when you’re walkin’ to the door
But I would not feel so all alone

Everybody must get stoned

They’ll stone ya when you’re at the breakfast table
They’ll stone ya when you are young and able
They’ll stone ya when you’re tryin’ to make a buck
They’ll stone ya and then they’ll say, “good luck”
Tell ya what, I would not feel so all alone

Everybody must get stoned

Well, they’ll stone you and say that it’s the end
Then they’ll stone you and then they’ll come back again
They’ll stone you when you’re riding in your car
They’ll stone you when you’re playing your guitar
Yes, but I would not feel so all alone

Everybody must get stoned

Well, they’ll stone you when you walk all alone
They’ll stone you when you are walking home
They’ll stone you and then say you are brave
They’ll stone you when you are set down in your grave
But I would not feel so all alone

Everybody must get stoned

Copyright © 1966 by Dwarf Music; renewed 1994 by Dwarf Music

The Hypnotist Collector

 

 

 

 

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10 thoughts on “Klas Burling Interview with Bob Dylan Stockholm 1966

    1. hahaha, yeah I finally did… you know, I was hiding myself (getting my ass out of here, :LOL:) Seriously,I had to procrastinate the more interesting article I wanted to write that I had already started. But it’s all right… I love the end, too, especially from the moment he said, “I happen to be a Swede myself,” ha ha

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Wonderful post dear Louis! I loved it. Thanks to you now I know so much more about one of the greatest poets of all times – Bob Dylan, who apart from being a poet – happened to be a musician as well. Have a beautiful Sunday and take a look at my new post in a free moment.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you my friend for visiting my blog and read my last post. I am glad you liked it and satisfied to know it May help you learn something else about one of the greatest Poets of our times, who happened to be a musician as well, as you stated. Thank you Also to let me know about your last post. I wouldn’t miss it. I will read it as soon as I’m back tonight, as i am going to a theatre now to watch a movie.

      Like

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