Stay With Me

bdShadows_In_The_Night_Front

I was not very diligent when it came to getting myself a copy of the penultimate Bob Dylan album, “Shadows in the Night.” Otherwise I would have run to the Amazon online store to pre-order it as soon as it was available. But the handful of covers of old songs sung by Sinatra did not particularly catch my attention, especially when none of the titles of the selected songs looked familiar to me. In fact I never got to buy it on my own initiative, but it was a gift someone gave me that I could never be grateful enough for.

The first time I heard it I did it lamely while devoting my time to other activities that would surely provide me a more immediate gratification. Or so I thought. One sometimes can be quite banal, even “snobbish.” My first impression was to welcome it strangely, as another daring feat of the famous curmudgeon, determined to demolish his legend. And I thought, “too gloomy, but anyway, it’s all right, he has more than earned the right to do what he pleases.” I said, “No matter, I’ll listen to it later more closely with the due respect it surely deserves. I have to put my five senses in the lyrics and the way he sings them.” And so I did. The next night I sat quietly and carefully listened to savor one by one each of the pieces of such a refined mosaic.

Why did I do it? First of all, as I said before, respect for the artist. Then, because, after so many years, I know that to get the real pleasure that understanding Dylan means, it is not enough just a first listen or a superficial approach. In fact, it’s necessary to penetrate the soul of the performer, chasing his rhymes to the last breath. No wonder the first time I heard “Visions of Johanna” I felt it was an unbearable litany. However, it soon ended up being as essential as “Desolation Row” and “Gates of Eden.” Those were meaningful songs. With them I came to understand that there is a peculiar beauty beyond the confines of reality and no matter how long one may argue about what is real and what is not, none of that does really matter within the place where Bob Dylan invites us.

VisionsOfJohanna_by_T.ScottMcLeod

giphy

Back to the main subject, what really matters is what happened after that. The gentle breeze of “I’m A Fool to Want You” lament was caressing my ears. The song evoked the warm tenderness and wrenching revelation of an unhealthy love that must be eradicated, but impossible to live without. The next cut uncovers the beautiful sadness in the evocative voice already worn out, transmitting the emotion of that bitter end in which the moon went down and the stars were gone, but the sun did not rise at dawn. There was nothing left to say, “The Night We Called It A Day.” All those heartbreak stories, hopeless loves that hurt and are at once unavoidable, sung with the mastering skillfulness of a gifted storyteller with a hoarse and pained voice and the extreme ability of a seasoned performer with the experience of half a century.

All of this was happening when the melancholy sound of the third track came to my ears, opening again my sense of perception as so many times before. I was mesmerized once again, though this time my thoughts ran along very different paths, back to a remote past that I could not even remember. The song, titled “Stay With Me” had made its live debut a few months earlier, played by Dylan in concert on October 26, 2014 at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, CA. Naturally I had heard the live version and probably some later performance from the same tour that would have impressed me quite favorably. However, I had not devoted the necessary attention yet to the studio recording filling now the room of my apartment. Something in that interpretation moves me and suggests a more thorough analysis. I have to listen to it again to talk about it. I leave it by now till the end.

bdShadowsInTheNight-Sinatra-covers-photo

Bob Dylan’s album, Shadows In The Night, released on February 3, 2015
A selection of songs made famous by Frank Sinatra

I continue to pay attention to “Autumn Leaves”, full of nostalgia and melancholy. It is a rounded composition that Dylan sings with considerable conviction and an unprecedented mastery never seen this way before in his recording career. We might say it is undoubtedly the most successful performance of the disc, for those experts in vocal technique, along with the previous cut, “Stay With Me”, which we will discuss in depth later. Let’s not forget the title that closes the album, “That Lucky Old Sun”; that wonderful prayer of the poor exhausted worker who envies the sun for doing nothing but wandering around heaven all day. That’s a tune that Dylan sang with some frequency in ’86 and then in Madison ’91, where he did an unforgettable version. He sang it again, but never in a register even vaguely resembling the way he does it here on this record especially designed for music lovers. “Why Try To Change Me Now” is next in quality to these aforementioned cuts, talking about dreams lying on the ground. The old troubadour sings a complaint of a sentimental wanderer unable to be what he’s not. He’s singing it with veiled skepticism and a certain irony drawing on the indolent nature of his autumnal voice. It’s all about the impossibility for an unfortunate dreamer to lead a conventional life. The song refers to someone who accepts himself and accepts his fate, allowing people to speculate and laugh at him. Don’t you remember? I was always your clown. Why try to change me now? “Some Enchanted Evening” does not detract from the rest, but perhaps it is the track that had less impact on me throughout the album, along with “Where Are You”, even if the latter sense reminds me of “Lay Lady Lay” or “If I Threw It All Away.” Though I love the way he is humming that swinging tune when he says: “Who can explain it, who can tell you why? Fools give you reasons wise men never try.”  It almost reminds me of a certain Christmas carol and has its magic.

The melody of “Full Moon and Empty Arms” wraps me in its romantic aspiration and leads me into another dimension. It works as a throwback to the 30’s, invoking a time that I never met except in the American movies. Its cadence gives way to the unfounded hope of a dream that, in the disenchanted voice of the outdated ‘crooner’ Dylan has become, sounds too illusory. Softly, the song, much more toned with the appearance of a sigh than with the formulation of a desire, wakes up in me emotions that have much to do with broken dreams. It also opens a loophole to the still remote possibility of a rewarding end:

“Full Moon and Empty Arms
Tonight I’ll use the magic moon to wish upon
And next full moon
If my one wish comes true
My empty arms will be filled with you”

However, in the current Dylan’s voice, as he uttered those words, the way he marks the breaks, how he phrases it in that warm and grave whisper, leaves the listener yielded to discouragement. Most likely there will not be another full moon, and if there is, one tends to believe those arms will still remain empty.

bob-dylan-shadows-in-the-night-FullMoon

The first two times I heard “Where Are You?” it did not say too much to me. It’s a corny song, I thought, and although its performer strives to put all of his faith into the heart of this old tune the result seemed a little loose. What is surprising is that listening to it now several times in a row trying to find adjectives to describe my impressions, I just ended up admitting that there is a certain beauty in it. Has a taste of ripe fruit, reminder of a distant past. It is the sweet, sad scent of nostalgia. I tried to express what the nuances that the veteran artist of Columbia incorporates on his version suggest. But in the end it didn’t matter, because what really transcends is not the quality of his performance, but the patina of time. I mean that old flavor that not only belongs to the song itself but to the very nature of the voice that interprets it.

Next is about the penultimate track. What’ll I do when you’re far away and I am blue? What’ll I do? When I am wondering who is kissing you what’ll I do? I know what you’re going to tell me, could be a song by José Luis Perales. It may appear so. But it’s not like that. Not such a kind of song, at least not in Dylan’s voice. While listening to this stanza:

“What’ll I Do with just a photograph
To tell my troubles to?

When I’m alone
With only dreams of you
That will not come true
What’ll I do?”

We can see that haunting image of the subject drowning his sorrow at the only one photo he possesses of his beloved one. That’s a passage that hardly fits into the idea that I have of the Spanish singer. And I say that without involving any contempt for the work of the songwriter from Castejon (Cuenca). But for me “What’ll I Do” is not among the best cuts of the disc, either. I have already mentioned the most remarkable ones and it only remains to be said, before analyzing my favorite song from the CD, that the finishing touch comes with “That Lucky Old Sun” in a masterful performance. Bob Dylan usually ends his studio albums with a significant track, generally of high quality. And this “Shadows in the Night” is no exception.

bd-w-Frank-and-Bruce

Bruce Springsteen, Frank Sinatra and Bob Dylan

I had seen “The Cardinal” many years ago, but could not remember the argument. I was warned that the main theme on the soundtrack of the film was the tune of that “Stay With Me” which was performed by Dylan at his Hollywood concert. I was also informed that the song belonged to his then new album, “Shadows in the Night”, something I was not aware of yet. Equally, it was also announced to me that the content of the film probably had much to do with the decision of the singular performer to include the song in his last work. For that reason I decided to see the movie again and I’ve seen it once more now to have it fresh in my mind as I write about this piece which seems to me the soul of the disc.

TheCardinal_xlg

The cinematographic work is about faith and loyalty, not only the Catholic faith, but faith in one’s own convictions and loyalty to principles. This is a complex and ambitious film about the power of church and the powers that be, in the socio-political aspect. Nationalism, totalitarianism, racism and discrimination of any kind are severely criticized in the movie. On a personal level it runs between existential doubt, the reaffirmation of faith to overcome weakness and the loyalty. Basically it raises the dilemma of choosing between faith, loyalty to principles, or loyalty to the people who trusted us. And it is in the moments when the question arises that the main theme appears on the soundtrack. The same melody starts again whenever loyalty to a human being becomes the main subject, whether referring to friendship, fraternity or humanitarian devotion.

And indeed the song moves between these two issues, faith and loyalty, which appear to be linked with each other in the plot. A closer look at the lyrics reveals that it is written as a prayer. The doubts about faith, existential concerns and weakness, give way to feelings of loneliness and then weariness and despair ensue and know only one consolation: the continued support and loyalty of those we trust, whether God or anybody else.

Another interesting factor that dominates the film and is seen in the first line of the song is the internal struggle between humility and ambition.

I firmly believe that Bob Dylan knew the film well and effectively choosing “Stay With Me” was conditioned by the theme of the film and the use of that melody made on the soundtrack. Hence the performance of the controversial ‘crooner’ highlights moments of weakness and does not seem to seek shelter in faith and trust on high through humility and prayer, as suggested in the lyrics. But instead, seems to have more confidence in the loyalty of his fans who remained faithful, in spite of everything.

It is revealing the way he pronounces this:

“And I go seeking shelter
And I cry in the wind”

And how very seriously he intones the final stanza:

“Though the road buckles under
Where I walk, I walk alone
Till I find to my wonder
Every path leads to Thee
All that I can do is pray
Stay With Me
Stay With Me”

In the film, when the sister of the future Cardinal receives a slap from her mother for initiating a courtship with an individual of Jewish origin and the mother insults her by calling her ‘slut’, the girl runs upstairs to find shelter in her bedroom. Brother priest comes up to comfort her and tells her as he embraces her:

“Remember when you were a little girl and I hugged you and said: ‘Hold me tight and no matter what happens hang on me and never let me go’?”

TheCardinal-Photo

The music of this ballad sounds again when Mona, the girl, confesses to her brother that she had carnal relations with the Jewish guy. The priest, based on his Catholic faith, rejects any option other than repentance, compelling her to leave her boyfriend forever. Offended and betrayed when she tried to cling to him to save herself, Mona fled in horror without receiving absolution.

That is exactly the same feeling that I perceive in Dylan’s performance. And it is what I think Dylan conveys in his version of this song which, in his hoarse lament, becomes sublime. The fear of not being understood, feeling rejected, betrayed. But more than a prayer, it sounds like a plea when he says: “All I can do is pray”. And it seems to me I hear him say, “Hang on me and never let me go, stay with me, stay with me.”

bdShadows_In_The_Night_Back

The Hipnotist Collector

Quédate Conmigo

bdShadows_In_The_Night_Front

No fui muy diligente a la hora de hacerme con un ejemplar del penúltimo disco de Bob Dylan, el álbum titulado “Shadows In The Night”. En cualquier otro caso habría corrido a visitar la tienda on line de Amazon para encargarlo con antelación en cuanto estuvo disponible. Pero el puñado de versiones de antiguas canciones interpretadas por Sinatra no llamaba especialmente mi atención. Más aún cuando ninguno de los títulos de las canciones seleccionadas me resultaba familiar. De hecho nunca llegué a adquirirlo por propia iniciativa, sino que fue un regalo que me hicieron que nunca agradeceré lo suficiente.

La primera vez que lo escuché lo hice sin demasiada convicción mientras dedicaba mi tiempo a otras actividades que seguramente me proporcionarían una más inmediata gratificación. O eso creía yo. Uno a veces puede resultar de lo más banal, incluso “snob”. Mi primera impresión fue acogerlo con extrañeza, mas bien como otra osadía del afamado cascarrabias, empeñado en demoler su leyenda. Y pensé, “demasiado sombrío, pero en fin, está bien, se ha ganado con creces el derecho de hacer lo que le venga en gana”. Me dije, “no importa, ya lo escucharé más adelante con el debido respeto y con mayor detenimiento, seguro que lo merece. Tendré que poner mis cinco sentidos en la letra de las canciones y en su forma de cantarlas”. Y así lo hice. A la noche siguiente me senté tranquilamente a escucharlo y a saborear una por una cada una de las piezas de tan refinado mosaico.

¿Que por qué lo hice? En primer lugar, como ya he dicho, por respeto al artista, y luego porque, después de tantos años, ya sé que para llegar al verdadero placer de los sentidos que significa entender a Dylan, no basta con la primera escucha o con un acercamiento superficial, hay que penetrar en el alma del intérprete persiguiendo en sus rimas hasta el último aliento. No en vano la primera vez que oí “Visions Of Johanna” me pareció una letanía insufrible y en poco tiempo acabó siendo tan imprescindible como lo fueron “Desolation Row” y “Gates Of Eden”. Canciones llenas de significado. Con ellas llegué a entender que hay una peculiar belleza más allá de los confines de la realidad y que por más que uno discuta sobre lo que es real y lo que no, nada de eso importa dentro de ese lugar al que Bob Dylan nos invita.

VisionsOfJohanna_by_T.ScottMcLeod

giphy

Aunque lo que de verdad importa es lo que ocurrió entonces. La suave brisa del lamento de “I’m A Fool To Want You”, la cálida ternura y la desgarradora revelación de un amor enfermizo que es necesario erradicar, pero sin el que es imposible vivir. La hermosa tristeza en la evocadora voz ya gastada transmitiendo la emoción de ese amargo final en el que descendió la luna y desaparecieron las estrellas, pero el sol no salió al amanecer. No había ya nada que decir, “The Night We Called It A Day (la noche en que lo dejamos)”. Todas esas historias de desengaño, de amores sin remedio que lastiman y son a un tiempo inevitables, cantadas con la maestría de un dotado narrador con la voz ronca y dolida y la extremada habilidad de un avezado intérprete con la experiencia de medio siglo.

Todo eso estaba sucediendo cuando el sonido melancólico de la tercera pista llega a mis oídos, abriendo de nuevo mi sentido de la percepción como tantas otras veces. Solo que esta vez discurría por caminos muy diferentes, de vuelta a un pasado lejano que ni siquiera podría recordar. La canción, titulada “Stay With Me (Quédate Conmigo)”, había hecho su debut en directo pocos meses antes, interpretada por Dylan en el concierto del 26 de Octubre de 2014 en el Dolby Theatre de Hollywood, CA. Naturalmente yo ya había escuchado esa versión en directo y probablemente alguna otra versión posterior de esa misma gira que me habría impresionado muy favorablemente. Sin embargo, no le había dedicado aún la atención requerida a la grabación de estudio que ahora llenaba la sala de mi apartamento. Algo en esa interpretación me conmueve y sugiere un análisis mas exhaustivo. Tengo que escucharlo de nuevo para poder hablar de ello. Lo dejo para el final.

bdShadowsInTheNight-Sinatra-covers-photo

Bob Dylan’s album, Shadows In The Night, released on February 3, 2015
A selection of songs made famous by Frank Sinatra

Continúo atento a “Autumn Leaves”, llena de nostalgia y melancolía. Una composición redonda que Dylan canta con una convicción nada desdeñable comparativamente y una maestría sin precedentes en su carrera discográfica. Sin duda la más lograda interpretación del disco, para aquellos expertos en técnica vocal, junto con el tema anterior, “Stay With Me”, del que luego hablaremos en profundidad. Sin olvidar el título que cierra el álbum, “That Lucky Old Sun”; Esa maravillosa plegaria del pobre trabajador extenuado que envidia al sol por no hacer nada sino dar vueltas por el cielo todo el día. Un tema que Dylan ya cantó con cierta frecuencia en el año 86 y luego en Madison ’91, donde hizo una versión inolvidable. Volvió a cantarla en alguna otra ocasión, pero nunca en un registro ni parecido a como lo hace aquí en este disco especialmente elaborado para melómanos. “Why Try To Change Me Now” les sigue en calidad a estos cortes antes mencionados, hablando de sueños echados por tierra. El viejo trovador entona aquí con mucho escepticismo y una cierta ironía en el carácter indolente de su voz otoñal la queja de un trotamundos sentimental incapaz de ser lo que no es. La imposibilidad para un lamentable soñador de llevar una vida convencional. Alguien que se acepta a si mismo y acepta su destino, permitiendo que la gente haga conjeturas y se burle de él ¿No lo recuerdas? Siempre fui tu payaso ¿Por qué intentar cambiarme ahora? “Some Enchanted Evening” no desmerece del resto, pero tal vez sea el tema del disco que menos impacto ha causado en mi, junto con “Where Are You”, incluso si el sentido último recuerda “Lay Lady Lay” o “If I Threw It All Away”. Y eso que me encanta la forma de canturrear ese bamboleo de la tonadilla cuando dice: “Who can explain it, who can tell you why? Fools give you reasons, wise men never try (¿Quien puede explicarlo, quien sabe por qué? Los locos tienen razones que los sabios no entienden)”. Casi me recuerda a un villancico y tiene su magia.

Como en una vuelta a los años 30 que no conocí salvo en las películas Americanas, la melodia de “Full Moon And Empty Arms” me envuelve en su romántica aspiración y me guía hacia otra dimensión donde su cadencia deja paso a la infundada esperanza de un sueño que, en la voz desencantada del ‘crooner’ trasnochado que Dylan ha llegado a ser, resulta demasiado ilusorio. Suavemente, entonada más con la apariencia de un suspiro que con la de la formulación de un deseo, la canción despierta en mi emociones que tienen mucho que ver con los sueños rotos. También abre un resquicio a la posibilidad todavía remota de un final gratificante:

“Full moon and empty arms
Tonight I’ll use the magic moon to wish upon
And next full moon
If my one wish comes true
My empty arms will be filled with you

(Luna llena y brazos vacíos
Esta noche formularé un deseo a la mágica luz de la luna
Y la próxima luna llena,
Si mi deseo se cumple,
Mis brazos vacíos te estarán abrazando)”

Sin embargo, en la actual voz de Dylan, tal como él pronuncia esas palabras, como marca las pausas, como frasea en ese cálido y grave susurro, deja al oyente rendido al desaliento. Probablemente no habrá otra luna llena y, si la hay, uno tiende a creer que esos brazos seguirán vacíos.

bob-dylan-shadows-in-the-night-FullMoon

Las dos primeras veces que escuché “Where Are You?” no me decía gran cosa. Es una canción cursi, opinaba, y por más que su intérprete se empeñe en poner toda su fe en el meollo de este viejo tema el resultado me parecía un poco flojo. Lo sorprendente es que al escucharla ahora varias veces seguidas tratando de encontrar calificativos con los que describir mis impresiones, acabo por admitir que hay una cierta belleza en ella. Un sabor a fruta madura, a un pasado remoto. El dulce y triste aroma de la nostalgia. Trataba de expresar lo que sugieren los matices que el veterano artista de Columbia incorpora a esta versión suya. Pero al final eso carecía de importancia, porque lo que de verdad trasciende no es la calidad de la interpretación, sino la patina del tiempo. Ese sabor añejo que no solo pertenece a la canción en si misma sino a la propia naturaleza de la voz que la interpreta.

Penúltima pista. ¿Qué haré cuando estés lejos y esté triste? ¿Qué haré? Cuando me pregunte quien te besa ¿qué haré? Ya sé lo que me vais a decir, podría ser una canción de Jose Luis Perales. Puede parecerlo. Pero no es así. No al menos en la voz de Dylan. Aunque atendiendo a esta estrofa:

“What’ll I do with just a photograph
To tell my troubles to?

When I’m alone
With only dreams of you
That won’t come true
What’ll I do?

(¿Qué haré con sólo una fotografía
A la que contarle mis penas?

Cuando esté solo,
Solo con mis sueños
que no se cumplirán
¿Qué haré?)”

Encontramos esa evocadora imagen del sujeto ahogando sus pesares ante la única foto que posee de su amada. Un pasaje que difícilmente encaja en la idea que yo tengo del cantautor Español. Sin que ello suponga menosprecio alguno hacia la obra del compositor de Castejón (Cuenca). Pero tampoco está para mi este “What’ll I Do” entre lo mejor del disco. Lo más destacable ya lo he mencionado y solo resta decir, antes de analizar mi canción favorita, que el broche de oro lo pone “That Lucky Old Sun” con una interpretación magistral. Bob Dylan suele acabar sus álbumes de estudio con un tema significativo, generalmente de gran calidad. Y este “Shadows In The Night” no es la excepción.

bd-w-Frank-and-Bruce

Bruce Springsteen, Frank Sinatra and Bob Dylan

Había visto “El Cardenal” hace ya muchos años, pero no recordaba el argumento. Me advirtieron de que el tema principal en la banda sonora de la película era la melodía de ese “Stay With Me” que Dylan había estrenado en su concierto de Hollywood. También me informaron de que dicha canción pertenecía a su entonces nuevo álbum, “Shadows In The Night”, algo de lo que yo no era consciente todavía. E igualmente me anunciaron que probablemente el contenido del film tenía mucho que ver con la decisión del singular intérprete de incluir ese tema en su último trabajo. Por esa razón decidí ver la película otra vez y he vuelto a verla ahora de nuevo para tenerla fresca en la memoria mientras escribo sobre esta pieza que se me antoja el alma del disco.

TheCardinal_xlg

La obra cinematográfica versa sobre la fe y la lealtad, no exclusivamente la fe católica, sino la fe en las propias convicciones y la fidelidad a unos principios. Se trata de una película compleja y ambiciosa sobre el poder de la iglesia y los poderes fácticos, en el aspecto socio-político. Los nacionalismos, totalitarismos, el racismo y la discriminación de cualquier índole son severamente criticados en la cinta. En el ámbito personal discurre entre la duda existencial, la reafirmación de la fe ante la flaqueza y la lealtad. Básicamente plantea el dilema de la elección entre la fe, la lealtad a unos principios, o la lealtad a las personas que confiaron en nosotros. Y es en los momentos en que esa duda surge cuando hace su aparición el tema principal en la banda sonora. La misma melodía vuelve a escucharse siempre que la lealtad a un ser humano se convierte en protagonista, ya sea referida a la amistad, la fraternidad o la vocación humanitaria.

Y efectivamente la canción se mueve entre esos dos temas, la fe y la lealtad, que en la trama aparecen vinculados entre si. Una mirada atenta a la letra de la canción revela su condición de plegaria. Las dudas ante la fe, la duda existencial, la flaqueza, dan paso al sentimiento de soledad y la debilidad y el desánimo solo conocen un consuelo: el apoyo constante y la lealtad de aquellos en quienes confiamos. Ya sea Dios u otros.

Otro factor interesante que domina la película y se vislumbra en el primer verso de la canción es la lucha interna entre la humildad y la ambición.

Tengo la firme convicción de que Bob Dylan conocía bien la película y que efectivamente la elección de “Stay With Me” estuvo condicionada por la temática del film y el uso que de la melodía se hace en la banda sonora. De ahí que la interpretación del controvertido ‘crooner’ subraye los momentos de flaqueza y no parezca buscar refugio en la fe y la confianza en el altísimo a través de la humildad y la oración, como sugiere la letra, sino que por el contrario parece confiar más en la lealtad de quienes siguen siendo sus incondicionales, a pesar de los pesares.

Es proverbial como pronuncia ese:

“And I go seeking shelter
And I cry in the wind

(Voy buscando refugio
Y exclamo al viento)”

Y como entona muy gravemente esa estrofa final:

“Though the road buckles under
Where I walk, walk alone
Till I find to my wonder
Every path leads to Thee
All that I can do is pray
Stay With Me
Stay With Me

(Aunque el camino se inclina pendiente abajo
Por donde yo camino, camino solo
Hasta que, para mi asombro, descubro
Que todos los caminos conducen a Ti
Y todo lo que puedo hacer es rezar
Quédate conmigo
Quédate conmigo”

En la película, cuando la hermana del futuro Cardenal recibe una bofetada de su madre por haber iniciado un noviazgo con un individuo de origen judío y ésta le insulta llamándole ‘guarra’, la chica corre escaleras arriba a refugiarse en su dormitorio. El hermano sacerdote sube a consolarla y le dice mientras le abraza:

“¿Recuerdas cuando eras niña y te abrazaba y te decía: ‘Abrázame fuerte y pase lo que pase agárrate a mi y no me sueltes’?”

TheCardinal-Photo

La música de esta balada vuelve a sonar cuando Mona, la chica, se confiesa con su hermano de haber tenido relaciones carnales con el muchacho judío. El sacerdote, basándose en su fe católica, rechaza cualquier otra opción que no sea la del arrepentimiento, conminándole a abandonar a su novio para siempre. Ofendida y traicionada cuando intentaba aferrarse a él para salvarse, Mona huye despavorida sin recibir la absolución.

Exactamente esa sensación es la que yo percibo. Eso es lo que yo creo que transmite Dylan en su versión de este tema que él, en su ronco lamento, convierte en sublime. El miedo a no ser comprendido, a sentirse rechazado, traicionado. Más que rezar, parece suplicar cuando dice: “All I can do is pray (lo único que puedo hacer es rezar)”. Y a mi me parece oírle decir: “Agárrate a mi y no me sueltes, quédate conmigo, quédate conmigo”.

bdShadows_In_The_Night_Back

El Coleccionista Hipnótico

La Muerte del Rock’n’Roll

image

Coincidiendo con las primeras noticias sobre el lanzamiento del nuevo álbum de Dylan, cuyo título, “Fallen Angels (Ángeles Caídos)”, resulta ya más que sugerente, el escritor Brent L. Smith publicaba el 13 de Abril un revelador artículo que he considerado digno de ser traído aquí hoy para ser analizado y comentado. Una excelente amiga que vive en California me condujo hasta él y por ello le estoy sumamente agradecido. El ensayo se refiere a la única entrevista que Dylan concedió el año pasado, aparecida en la revista bimensual de la AARP (American Association of Retired Persons – Asociación Americana de Personas Jubiladas) a raíz de la publicación de su anterior trabajo, el insólito “Shadows in The Night (Sombras en la Noche)”, que reunía 10 viejas baladas sacadas del cancionero de Frank Sinatra. El septuagenario cantautor aclaraba en dicha entrevista las razones que le llevaron a grabar esas canciones y su genuina intención al publicar un álbum de esas características en los tiempos que corren. Pero no era esa la cuestión que motivó al autor del texto al que hago referencia a tomar dicha entrevista como punto de partida de su tesis, sino las atrevidas declaraciones que el viejo y astuto trovador hacía en ella acerca de las verdaderas razones que, según él, provocaron la muerte del Rock’n’Roll. Asombrosas declaraciones que nadie pareció tomarse en serio y sin embargo el articulista en cuestión  interpretó como la “desgarradora revelación de un asesinato silencioso”. Aunque esa es una conclusión demasiado severa.

Dylan habla de la segregación comercial que sufrió el Rock cuando el movimiento a favor de los derechos civiles comenzó a cobrar fuerza. El Rock’n’Roll – dice – había sido desde sus inicios un invento Americano racialmente integrado, pura fusión inyectada a través de las ondas en los dormitorios de los adolescentes desde mediados de los 50. En el momento en que la lucha por los derechos civiles parece amenazar el orden establecido, el género resulta convenientemente dividido, por la astucia del sistema, entre música de Blancos (Invasión Británica) y música de Negros (Soul). Las declaraciones de Dylan ponen de manifiesto las razones que hicieron posible dicha segregación. Los prejuicios raciales llevan a considerar el mestizaje del Rock algo extremadamente amenazador y deciden desmantelarlo, empezando por el llamado escándalo del “Payola”. Las compañías discográficas y distribuidoras sobornaban a los DJ’s para que difundiesen determinados discos de forma sistemática, logrando así dejar fuera de las ondas toda la Música Negra, especialmente aquella que estaba lejos de su control e iba en contra de sus intereses.

image

Lester Lanin durante los interrogatorios del escándalo del “Payola”

February 1, 1960                                                    Photo Credit: Ed Clark

Es evidente que las acusaciones de Dylan son irrefutables. Citando a Smith, “ese fue un momento desmoralizador en el historicismo de la música” y leyendo su artículo podemos constatar “los devastadores efectos que el gran capital puede tener cuando despliega semejante aparato en el intento de secuestrar la música para siempre”. Pero llegar a creer que verdaderamente algo asesinó al Rock es demasiado derrotista. Se ha hablado mucho sobre la muerte del Rock’n’Roll desde el advenimiento del Punk y muchos artistas, además de los Sex Pistols, han tratado el tema en sus canciones, pero aún así, todavía hoy, parece aventurado asegurar que el Rock ha muerto.

Por diversas razones que el artículo de Smith analiza en profundidad muy acertadamente el Rock es considerado depravado, escandaloso, vulgar y pernicioso dentro de la burguesía, viéndose rechazado por las buenas costumbres y perseguido por el poder establecido. El artículo de Smith indaga sobre el asunto esgrimiendo razonamientos inspirados en diversas fuentes que van desde los escritos de Norman Mailer acerca del Negro Blanco, el hipster y la inherente sexualidad del jazz a las declaraciones de Frank Sinatra y Martin Luther King Jr. en detrimento del Rock’n’Roll, pasando por las consideraciones de John Adams vertidas en una carta escrita en 1779. En la mencionada carta Adams describía la depravación del ambiente y el impacto de la música que se escuchaba en las tabernas y “public houses (casas de citas)” (también conocidas como pubs) frecuentadas por los negros, en los siguientes términos: “El delirante estruendo sería suficiente para inducir a cualquier ser humano sensato y virtuoso a abandonar tan execrable raza a su propia perdición”.

Pero, como apunta el propio Smith: “Donde unos ven depravación y vulgaridad, otros ven liberación. Donde unos oyen delirante estruendo otros escuchan música”.

image

La canción de Don Mc Lean, “American Pie”, habla de la evolución del Rock’n’Roll a través de las décadas hasta 1971, comenzando por los 50 y el famoso verso “the Day the music died (el Día que murió la música)“, en clara alusión al fatídico accidente de aviación que se cobró las vidas de Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens y J.P. “Big Bopper” Richardson en un despiadado golpe del destino. Eso ocurría en Febrero de 1959. El último año de la década resultó ser tristemente perjudicial para el Rock. Junto al fatal incidente que causó la muerte de esas tres figuras míticas, Chuck Berry era arrestado en Diciembre y procesado “por cruzar las fronteras del estado transportando a una menor con fines inmorales en flagrante violación del Acta de Mann (Mann Act)”. Aunque la primera causa fue sobreseída (ya que alegó haber sido objeto de prejuicios raciales) el juzgado decidió volver a procesar a Berry. Tras el segundo juicio fue finalmente condenado a tres años de cárcel. Todo esto, unido a los escándalos del “Payola”, la desenfrenada sexualidad inherente al Rock’n’Roll y la depravación vista en ello, provocó la estampida que dejó al Rock en manos de los blancos y lo debilitó hasta convertirlo en un lenguaje fácilmente asimilable por el sistema.

Naturalmente, tal depravación solo era vista por “aquellos que compartían el código liberal de Adams, con su sentido elitista de puritana moralidad” – como Smith define con rigurosa precisión – los mismos que “sentaron las bases de la ‘Independencia’ Americana y su consecuentemente negativo sistema de valores heredado hasta nuestros días”.

Hay que tener en cuenta que, como sugería Dylan cuando hablaba del movimiento por los derechos civiles, mencionando incluso el escándalo del “Payola”, el problema no era solo una cuestión de carácter racial o moral, sino que implicaba también intereses políticos y económicos, sin duda la verdadera preocupación de las principales compañías discográficas y distribuidoras. Smith alude a lo mismo, en un contexto político, cuando se refiere a aquellos que “sentaron las bases de la ‘Independencia’ Americana y su consecuentemente negativo sistema de valores”.

Es por esa razón que, declara Smith, “todavía existen aquellos que activamente rechazan el legado de semejante sistema de valores. Y es esta clase de rechazo, desviación, transgresión, algo que no solo yace en las raíces de lo que en realidad significa la desinhibida música Americana, sino que se ha convertido en una tradición en si mismo de la izquierda Americana”.

De todos modos, el proceso de segregación del Rock’n’Roll se logró de forma satisfactoria, como refleja Smith: “El Doo-wop fue inventado en los años 40 por una juventud negra en las esquinas de las calles, pero alcanzó las listas de éxitos a finales de los 50 cuando los Italo-Americanos lo adoptaron como suyo propio, mientras la mayoría de los intérpretes Afro-Americanos se pasaban a la música Soul”.

“Cuando el ‘Twist And Shout’ llega a América desde el otro lado del charco en 1964, el Rock’n’Roll ya había sufrido un linchamiento infernal ¿Quien – se pregunta Smith – era capaz de escuchar algo mas allá de los ineludibles aullidos de la Beatlemanía?”

image

A este punto el Rock’n’Roll se ha convertido en una cosa de músicos Blancos. No se ve un solo cantante Negro, ni guitarrista, liderando una banda de Rock’n’Roll, desde que Berry fue apartado del negocio. Pero Jimi Hendrix aparece en la escena del Rock para cambiar las cosas, volviendo a lo que siempre debería haber sido, de acuerdo con la teoría de Smith. Como Dylan hizo antes, “Bringing It All Back Home (Trayendolo Todo de Vuelta a Casa)” desde las Islas Británicas, Jimi aportaría su “Experience (Experiencia)” para llevar de nuevo al Rock’n’Roll a un terreno racialmente integrado.

Eso es lo que Brent L. Smith llama el Enigma Hendrix. Según sus propias palabras, “El acompañante-en-una-banda-de-R&B-convertido-en-fascinante-rockero, Jimi Hendrix, no solo revolucionó la manera de tocar la guitarra eléctrica, sino que psicodelizó su forma en una única actuación”. El autor del referido artículo continúa proporcionándonos una bastante emocional narración de los hechos ocurridos en el Monterrey Pop Festival en 1967, cuando Jimi Hendrix asombró a la audiencia, y al mundo, incendiando su guitarra, en “uno de los momentos mas intensos de la historia de la música Americana”.

image

Instantes después del acto flamígero, el joven fotógrafo Ed Caraeff “con literalmente el último disparo de su carrete, capturó una de las imágenes más icónicas del Rock. Incluso tuvo que utilizar su cámara para escudarse frente a las llamas que Hendrix invocaba con sus manos hacia las alturas”. Smith aún añade, “Era uno de esos momentos en los que aplaudir resulta casi vulgar”. Para hacernos sentir como si hubiésemos estado allí nos cuenta lo que la testigo de primera mano Michelle Philips de los Mamas And The Papas recuerda: “Yo estaba entre el público y estaba aterrada. No era el contenido sexual de su espectáculo lo que me aterraba, sino lo que hizo con su instrumento. Estaba arrojando gasolina sobre su guitarra y prendiéndole fuego. Nunca había visto nada igual en mi vida”. Entonces el joven escritor concluye: “Era algo al mismo tiempo tan sagrado y tan eléctrico; Apunta hacia lo espiritual – ¿o mas exactamente, lo esencial? – Después de todo, era la primera declaración matrimonial entre el Blues y la Psicodelia: Al Rock’n’Roll se le otorgaba un renacimiento místico”. Y llegando al extremo definitivamente religioso, Smith sacraliza el acontecimiento preguntándose, “Quemando su guitarra en efigie ¿aseguraba Hendrix la salvación del Rock en toda su pureza, para cualquiera en disposición de abrazarlo? Si los 50 fueron los días del viejo testamento del Rock ¿Era Hendrix aquí el uncido para morir por todos nuestros pecados?” Leyéndole tiene uno que reconocer la trascendencia de la actuación de Jimi Hendrix, incluso estar de acuerdo en que la influencia del guitarrista negro ha sido inconmensurable. Tenemos que admitir la fuerza devastadora y la significación de su revolucionario acto, pero yo tiendo a creer que había también mucho exhibicionismo en toda aquella parafernalia de la Jimi Hendrix Experience. De cualquier modo, fue ciertamente el gran momento, el manifiesto Rock de una vuelta a las raíces. Como el propio Smith escribe, “Lo que fuera que Hendrix fuese, él era el único intérprete capaz de reconciliar el roto, racialmente cargado y dicotomizado estado del Rock’n’Roll”.

De forma misteriosa, pero fácilmente comprensible, Smith vuelve a Dylan y escribe, “Sin olvidar que el más grandioso single de Hendrix fue la inmortal versión del ‘All Along The Watchtower’ de Bob Dylan, me gustaría regresar a la todavía leyenda viviente por derecho propio”. Y a continuación, inteligentemente afirma, “Cuando Dylan se volvió eléctrico en 1965 eso fue visto como una traición al género folk, algo que un montón de fans odiaron y por lo que le despreciaron, incluso hasta el día de hoy”. En realidad, “la transformación de trovador solitario a líder eléctrico fue, de hecho, su total reconocimiento y lealtad a la más pura música Americana. El Rock’n’Roll era una forma de arte nueva que emergía de la expansión más profunda del espíritu Americano”. Por supuesto, es verdad, y Dylan lo sabía, así que, “simplemente, hacia honor a sus raíces”.

Hay una excelente canción que una vez escribió Neil Young, titulada, “Hey Hey, My My (Out of The Blue)”, que formó parte de la banda sonora original de la película de Dennis Hopper “Out of The Blue”. El “film” retrataba a una adolescente Punk, fan de Elvis, que pensando que “es mejor arder que desvanecerse” comete suicidio después de asesinar a sus padres, en un intento de matar al Rock’n’Roll para siempre. Pero tal como la letra de Neil, en emocionante contraste con las imágenes de esa película, afirma: “El Rock’n’Roll permanecerá, hey hey, my my, el Rock’n’Roll nunca morirá”. Y esa es la única verdad.

Smith aún escribe un más que interesante epílogo en el cual describe lo que está sucediendo en los garajes e  improvisados  estudios a través del país en America – y yo añadiría, en todo el mundo. Como él dice, “Eso nos indica que a pesar de los turbulentos efectos de la expansión digital en todos los sectores de nuestra cultura en el siglo XXI, el Rock’n’Roll no solo está todavía pataleando sino que está floreciendo y lo está haciendo en la iluminada oscuridad, fuera del foco de atención de la cultura dominante”. Y si, incluso “aunque pueda ser arrebatado y comprado, apartado de la calle y desvergonzadamente adulterado en estudios corporativos otra vez ahora” lo que realmente sabemos es que la subterránea reactivación del ‘garage rock’ en la actualidad “prueba que es su espíritu lo que persiste y lo que vuelve a turbar el ‘statu quo’. Aún incita a los jóvenes de corazón a acudir a actuaciones en directo y está sacando a los adolescentes fuera de la aséptica monotonía  de los centros comerciales de los suburbios”.

Todo esto sucede, y sucederá siempre, porque, como escribió Dylan, “No se puede matar una idea”. Mientras haya alguien ahí fuera dispuesto a coger una guitarra, deseando echar el resto cantando para expresar su descontento por lo que está mal en el mundo, el Rock’n’Roll seguirá ahí, “out of the blue (caído del cielo)”… “and into the black (y en lo negro)”.

El Coleccionista Hipnótico

Bibliografía:

Brent L. Smith (13 de Abril de 2016) Like It Is: Bob Dylan Explains What Really Killed Rock’n’Roll. Consultado el 14 de Mayo de 2016 en https://medium.com/cuepoint/like-it-is-bob-dylan-explains-what-really-killed-rock-n-roll-f6a4b6587a1a#.

James Morgan, BBC News – Washington, DC (7 de Abril de 2015) What Do American Pie’s Lyrics mean? Consultado el 17 de Mayo de 2016 en http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-32196117

history.com Staff – This Day In History (28 de Octubre de 2009) Chuck Berry Goes On Trial For The Second Time. Consultado el 17 de Mayo de 2016 en http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/chuck-berry-goes-on-trial-for-the-second-time